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Parks and Meade Attorneys at Law | Columbus, OH

What does a criminal defense attorney do?

A criminal defense attorney performs many actions on behalf of their client, many being behind the scenes. So, what exactly does that entail? Analysis of Evidence Upon receiving Discovery documents or evidence against you, the attorney will have to take steps to properly analyze it. This is done by: Thoroughly and meticulously studying the facts and theories presented in the case, Independently testing evidence, sometimes with a third party, Examining evidence to see if there are any legal theories which work in conjunction to stop the conviction or amend the charges brought against the defendant. Investigation The first thing an attorney looks to do in an investigation is acquit their defendant. This process is completed by: Questioning the police about the methods and practices they used, Interviewing eyewitnesses and discussing …

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Parks and Meade Attorneys at Law | Columbus, OH

What Happens at the Lawyer’s Office?

Intake Whether you as the defendant or a close contact calls the attorney’s office on your behalf, first an intake will occur. During this time biographical information and basic background information of the case at hand is given such as location, court, charges, upcoming court dates, and the most important details of the situation. Here, a staff member of the firm will determine if the case is eligible to be taken, give a rough estimate of cost, and then find a time for you or your contact(s) to speak with the attorney. Preparing for the Consultation While it can be intimidating to share all the details of your situation, it is important to remember that the attorney is not there to judge. The actions in a case and your relative …

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E-Learning and Truancy: What You Need to Know Before It’s Too Late

Many parents are concerned about sending their kids back to school during the COVID-19 pandemic. What happens if you keep your kids at home? At what point is your child considered truant? Is the law the same school to school? Can I be fined as a parent? Can my ex-spouse use this against me for custody? ​Ohio Revised Codes 2151.011 and 3321 lays out the rules and definitions of truancy. A child may be reported as habitually truant if they have an unexcused absence for: 30 or more consecutive hours 42 or more hours in one school month, or 72 or more hours in a school year. As you approach these limits set by Ohio Law your school will often give parents written notification and require any absence be excused going …

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How do Ohio Courts decide custody?

Ohio uses what is referred to as the “best interest of the child” standard to make custody determinations. This determination is made by the courts evaluation of the statutorily defined factors. Ohio law allows the judge to consider the wishes of both parents and the children involved in custody decisions, if the child is old enough to communicate those wishes. Courts will look at how a child interacts with their parents and any siblings. Courts are generally not inclined to break up siblings or otherwise break relationships with family members. Courts examine the actions of the parents. Courts look for parents who have shown respect for prior custody orders and for the other parent’s relationship with the child. A parent who has consistently fulfilled child support obligations will be viewed …

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​Grandparent Rights in Ohio, know your rights

Grandparents rights have been under debate for decades. Parents have a fundamental right from the constitution to choose who will and will not be involved in a child’s life. In some states, grandparents have a right to have a relationship with their grandchild. The term grandparent’s rights refers to the legal concept that courts can order parents to allow grandparents to spend time with their grandchild. Ohio grandparents have a right to have a relationship with their grandchildren, but the facts of your circumstances must show that the visitation with the grandparents is in the child’s best interest. The statutes that govern these rights in Ohio are com When does Ohio order Grandparents rights for visitation? Ohio grandparents rights of visitation are allowed by statute in limited circumstances. When the …

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​How is child support calculated in Ohio?

In Ohio, child support is calculated by a formula that has been codified into state law. That formula takes the parent’s gross income and combines them. The formula allows for certain deductions, such as local income tax, child support for other children, or spousal support paid or received. This adjusted gross income is then applied to a chart that calculates the amount of child support required to equalize the costs of raising a child. The paying parent will pay his or her share of the amount to the other parent. There is also an adjustment made for if there is private health insurance being paid for the child or work related childcare. The final figure of the calculation is called the guideline child support and is presumed to be the correct amount …

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Parenting Schedules in the time of COVID-19: What to Do and What to Expect

The state of the world we currently find ourselves has not been seen in our lifetimes, possible never before seen. It is perfectly natural to feel out of your depth, especially when your children become involved. Many parents are asking questions, and we at Parks and Meade are here to help! ​Do I need to follow my custody agreement or parenting time order during the Stay-at-home order? The short answer to this question is yes. Ohio’s stay-at-home order states that one purpose for essential travel is to transport children to comply with a custody agreement. You are allowed to leave your home to transport your child to their other parent, and vice versa. Even with this being the case, what happens when one parent is deemed an essential worker? In …

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​COVID-19 and Your Estate: What You Need to Know

Life has changed very rapidly for America over the last couple of months. Many have been affected: illness in family, loss of family members, loss of work, and almost every other facet of our lives. Having an estate plan is a safety net for your family. Protect yourself, your family, and your finances by preparing an estate plan. ​Having a will ensures that your property is given to your family in a manner that you wish and may have discussed with your family. It allows you to leave property to persons other than your spouse or children, name a personal guardian for minor children, and to name an executor, someone you trust, to ensure that your will is carried out according to the terms you decided upon in your will. …

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Divorce or Dissolution: What’s the Difference?

Divorces and Dissolutions are legal actions to end a marriage in Ohio. There are key differences between the two that can help you decid which method of ending your marriage is best for you. Every situation has a unique set of circumstances and variables that can make a separation complicated. Divorce law can be difficult to navigate on your own due to the high level of stress caused by the emotional toll often found in domestic relations cases, so it is important to start your case with the correct legal decisions. ​Why would I choose a divorce? Divorce is the option best suited for spouses that are unable to reach an agreement on the terms of separating a marriage – asset and debt division, parental rights, and support. Divorce actions …

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Covid-19 and the Ohio Courts

​There is non-stop news about the pandemic, its spread, and the increasingly drastic measures the Governor and the Ohio Department of Health are taking to combat the disease. Something the news is not reporting on is how the disease is affecting people’s legal court cases in Ohio. The courthouses and the people who work in them are not immune from COVID-19, and many people have been left wondering about their hearings, bonds, attendance requirements, and parenting schedules. The short answer to your questions is this: if you have a lawyer- reach out to their office and ask what the status is of your case. If you don’t have a lawyer- you should find the website of the court your case is filed in and see if they have made any …

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